Category Archives: English

Harmful Gender Stereotypes in Ads to be Banned

Following a public consultation, CAP has today announced that ads will no longer be able to depict harmful gender stereotypes. (…) The new rule will come into force on 14 June 2019.

This change follows a review of gender stereotyping in ads by the ASA. The review found evidence suggesting that harmful stereotypes can restrict the choices, aspirations and opportunities of children, young people and adults and these stereotypes can be reinforced by some advertising, which plays a part in unequal gender outcomes.

(…) The evidence does not show that the use of gender stereotypes is always problematic and the new rule does not seek to ban gender stereotypes outright, but to identify specific harms that should be prevented.

CAP has published guidance to help advertisers stick to the new rule by providing examples of scenarios likely to be problematic in ads. For example:

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Maltesers “Look on the light side of disability”

A survey of 2,000 Brits found that 55 per cent think there aren’t more people with physical disabilities in ads because they ‘make people uncomfortable’, while 62 per cent say the same for those with mental disabilities. The second reason given was that people hadn’t been exposed enough to disabled communities.

Advertising has the opportunity to change that: the survey found that 63 per cent of those with physical disabilities think that seeing more disabled people in ads removes the stigma around their community, while five per cent wish that brands would be braver in showing ‘people like me’ in their ads.

Maltesers took an unprecedented step with their ad campaign (shown above) that featured disabled actors, but with mixed results. While the campaign proved to be the ‘most successful‘ advert for the brand in a decade and was widely praised for normalising disability, the ads have also garnered criticism for centring each storyline completely around the actor’s disability, rather than her other characteristics.

 

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“The headless women of hollywood” project calls out sexism in film


In each of the posters featured in the project, women’s bodies – often their derrieres, breasts or legs – are the main focal point, however their heads are nowhere to be seen. (…

“By decapitating the woman, she becomes an unquestionably passive object to the male gaze. The question of her consent is removed completely alongside her head, and her purpose becomes solely that of being looked at by men obediently.

“Her value is that only of her sexual appeal to men and not of her personhood.”

Headless Women of Hollywood catalogues all the heinous posters from across the tv, film and advertising industries that include women’s headless anatomy as their main selling point. NEWSFLASH: women are sentient beings with both brains and complex inner characters, even though they’re often not given such roles in movies.
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Just 19% of people in ads are from minority groups


Minority groups are featured in less than 20% of advertising, according to new research, but given 65% of people would feel more favourable about a brand that promotes diversity, companies are missing a huge opportunity to connect with consumers.

Minority groups including single parents, disabled people and the LGBT community continue to be let down by brands who are failing to create diverse and inclusive advertising, according to new research by Lloyds Banking Group, shown exclusively to Marketing Week.

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Bus company pulls topless ‘ride me’ adverts after outcry

Cardiff bus adverts featuring topless models holding a placard saying ‘ride me all day for £3’ caused social media storm

A bus company has come under fire for promoting a new route with a poster on the back of its vehicles showing an apparently topless woman holding a sign saying “ride me all day for £3”.
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The adverts, by Cardiff-based New Adventure Travel, prompted outrage in the city and on social media. The company, which runs services in Cardiff and elsewhere in Wales, including school buses, was promoting the launch of a fleet of new buses for a cross-city service in Cardiff.

At 11.30am on Monday, just a few hours after the campaign first appeared, the company said the adverts would be withdrawn.

Continue reading at: The Guardian