Tag Archives: Parody

Twerking men and kick-ass girls: how advertising learned to gender-flip

A hypersexualised commercial featuring a man with a big butt has gone viral – is advertising finally embracing a new and improved approach to gender roles?

moneysupermarket.com advert

Well, your wish has been granted, sort of, in the form of an advert for Moneysupermarket.com. If you haven’t seen “Epic Strut” yet, the precis is: a man with enormous buttocks, wearing hotpants and heels, twerks down the street to the Pussycat Dolls’ seminal anthem Don’t cha. It’s gender theorist Judith Butler meets big booty culture – in a desperate attempt to make an ad for a car insurance comparison website go viral. And this somewhat bizarre formula appears to have worked. The ad has been viewed more than 1.4m times on YouTube and “Dave”, the man with the enormous buttocks, has ambitiously been dubbed the “new Kim Kardashian” by the likes of Grazia.

So a man with a prosthetic posterior (yep, sorry to break it to you, but Dave’s assets aren’t entirely his own) gyrates on camera to try to sell something … so what? Well, that doesn’t normally happen, that’s what. Since time immemorial, or at least since the 1970s, when sex exited the furtive confines of the bed sheets and clambered onto the ad pages of the broadsheets, the bulk of the scantily clad backsides and bare body parts in the media have belonged to women.

It’s not just adverts that are to blame: a study of Rolling Stone cover imagespublished over four decades found that, in the 1960s, 11% of men and 44% of women on the covers were sexualised, while in the 2000s, it was 17% of men and 83% of women. The study also found that, while sexualised representations of both men and women have become more common, women were much more likely to be “hypersexualised”.

Continue reading at: The Guardian

‘SNL’ parodies sexist stereotypes in Super Bowl ads

In an all-too-real parody, Saturday Night Life poked fun at the way some football ads portray women as nothing more than eager-to-please snack-getters. The sketch features a bored housewife that uses her all-new Totino’s Super Bowl Activity Pack, which includes cheap toys to keep her occupied while the game is on.

Continue reading: ‘SNL’ parodies sexist stereotypes in Super Bowl ads

Gender-flips are a simple and smart way to turn sexism on its head

Australian comedy duo Bondi Hipsters have gone viral by subverting Miranda Kerr’s GQ photoshoot – and even Jennifer Lopez has got in on the act

Bondi Hipsters Miranda Kerr GQ

Bondi Hipster

Sometimes the best way to make a point about sexism is also the simplest. Australian comedians the Bondi Hipsters parodied this month’s British GQ by showing heavily bearded Dom Nader mimicking the naked poses struck by model Miranda Kerr. Their shoot went viral. Christiaan Van Vuuren, Nader’s real-life alter ego, told the Huffington Post that the idea was a response to “the over-sexualisation of the female body in the high-fashion world. For some reason, as soon as you put a man in there … it’s an entirely different thing that we aren’t used to seeing.”

Gender-flips used to challenge sexist stereotypes are having a moment. Last week, in a Guardian video, Leah Green went undercover, acting out scenarios reported by women to the Everyday Sexism website. She asked a barman if he’d give her a lapdance, for example, prompting obvious bemusement.

Continue reading at: The Guardian