Tag Archives: Television

Men know nothing at all about being sex objects | Barbara Ellen | Comment is free | The Guardian

men women sex objects

Some of you may be aware that Games of Thrones actor Kit Harington complained about his sexual objectification, saying: “It can sometimes feel like your art is being put to one side for your sex appeal and I don’t like that” and: “To always be put on a pedestal as a hunk is slightly demeaning. It really is and it’s in the same way as it is for women.”

Following the furore, Harington now says that he’ll be a “good little hunk and keep his mouth shut”. That would be Harington’s pretty little mouth spouting adorable nonsense from his fluffy little head? In fairness to Harington, he raised an interesting point: could it be seriously argued that male sexual objectification is in any way equivalent to the female variety? Because, from where I’m sitting, the concept is at once offensive and hilarious.

Continue reading at: Men know nothing at all about being sex objects | Barbara Ellen | Comment is free | The Guardian.

Top 10 Sexist Media Moments of 2014 | Patricia Leavy, PhD

Sadly, the mainstream media’s addiction to sexism has yet again provided us with a long list of competitive material for our annual top 10 sexist media moments. The media are sexist in a variety of ways, but most apparent is the manner in which news is reported and that they just can’t seem to control themselves at inventing stories that, well, aren’t really news — think: the endless reporting that happens about celebrity looks and gossip

Continue reading at: Top 10 Sexist Media Moments of 2014 | Patricia Leavy, PhD

The Media’s Enormous Gender Problem, In One Chart

By now, it should be obvious that women are drastically underrepresented in the news media. But a new study by the Women’s Media Center shows just how pervasive the media’s gender gap is across all kinds of news outlets. The center issued an update to its annual State of the Media report on Wednesday, with new research about the number of male and female contributors to organizations in print, on television and online. The results were clear: 63 percent of the 27,000 pieces of content examined by the study were contributed by men. 36 percent were contributed by women—a nearly 2-1 difference. The platform didn’t matter. The eight newspapers studied had 63 percent male contributors; the four evening newscasts had 65 percent; the four websites had 60 percent; and the two main wire services had 65 percent. The gender of the people at the top wasn’t an easy predictor of the levels of gender parity either.

Diane Sawyer, for instance, had the second-highest percentage of male contributors (66) out of all the evening newscasts. (She was beaten by Scott Pelley, whose CBS newscast had a whopping 72 percent male contribution rate.) And New York Times editor Jill Abramson is presiding over the biggest gender gap out of all of the top 10 newspapers in the country. And the gender gaps are especially pronounced in areas like crime, politics and world affairs. Women, it would seem, are still being disproportionately confined to more stereotypically “feminine” beats such as lifestyle and health. Take a look at the WMC’s findings in the sobering graphic …

Continue reading: The Media’s Enormous Gender Problem, In One Chart

Top 10 Sexist Media Moments of 2013 | Patricia Leavy, PhD

In 2012, the media shamefully spun stories that sexualized women athletes (the U.S. Women’s Gymnastics Team), called women voters too emotional and mindless, tried some good old-fashioned “slut shaming” (Rush Limbaugh on Sandra Fluke) and kept insinuating Jennifer Anniston had a “baby bump.” We are sad to report that little has changed.

Continue reading at: Top 10 Sexist Media Moments of 2013 | Patricia Leavy, PhD

Study Shows The Exact Age Actresses Begin Getting Paid Less

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Researchers examined the top 265 earning actresses and actors in Hollywood films from 1968 to 2008. While a female movie star’s average salary per film steadily increases in her 20s, this number drops off rapidly after she turns 34. Male actors’ compensation however, peaks around age 51 and shows no signs of decreasing with age. According to the study, “Men’s well-worn faces are thought to convey maturity, character and experience. A woman’s face, on the other hand, is valued for appearing young.”

Hollywood doesn’t allow women to age, which encourages the idea that growing older is not acceptable — even though it is inevitable (and beautiful).

Continue reading at: Study Shows The Exact Age Actresses Begin Getting Paid Less